Serum hepcidin level and iron status in a sample of obese Egyptian children

Enas Abdelhamid
22
Dec

Serum hepcidin level and iron status in a sample of obese Egyptian children

Obesity as a low-grade inflammatory disease was reported to increase iron tissue storage at the expense of circulating blood iron leading to anemia of inflammation, in which hepcidin may play a key role. However, the interrelation between obesity, iron status and hepcidin is still obscure. Thus, the focus of our interest is to assess serum hepcidin level and iron status and their correlation with body mass index in a sample of obese Egyptian children. Methods: Fifty obese children with mean age 7.71 ± 2.55 years and 30 apparently normal controls with mean age 6.88 ± 1.69 years were enrolled in this study. All children were subjected to full history taking, anthropometric assessment and measurement of hemoglobin, serum ferritin, total iron binding capacity and hepcidin levels. Results: Hemoglobin and ferritin levels were lower, while TIBC and serum hepcidin levels were higher in obese children than controls. Serum hepcidin level correlated positively with Z-score BMI(r = 0.781, p = 0.00) and TIBC9r=0.523, p=0.00) but negatively with Hb (r=-0.715, p=0.00) and ferritin (r = -0.218, p=0.05). Conclusion: The present study reported lower Hb and ferritin levels but higher TIBC and hepicidin levels among obese children. Strong positive correlation was found between hepcidin and Z-score BMI. Therefore, it could be concluded that obesity in children is associated with increased serum hepicidin level with a state of iron depletion.