Team KIPOW: Increasing Face-time and Playing for Pediatric Weight Loss

Hillary Gregg
22
Dec

Team KIPOW: Increasing Face-time and Playing for Pediatric Weight Loss

Introduction: Childhood Obesity results in cardiometabolic dysregulation, learning disabilities, and poor stress resilience. Many obese children are from low-income families in the public and charter school system. Federal and state government have drafted policy to provide healthy low-cost or free lunches and have also required 200 minutes of physical education for each 10 days of school. Despite these implementations, there is little data to support improvement in the obesity epidemic. The US Preventative Task Force guidelines recommend greater than 26 hours of face-time for long-term Pediatric weight loss success, which is not attainable in the traditional clinical model. Methods: Team KiPOW (Kid Power!) will help solve this problem. Team KiPOW is an academic-community partnership first started in Washington DC to help implement national health policy of nutrition and exercise in impoverished schools. A task force of trained, energetic medical and undergraduate students will go into schools in low-income areas weekly and model healthy behaviors during federally-funded school lunch and recess. This “face time” with mentors (which cannot be achieved in a traditional healthcare visit) will lead to positive health behavior change and improved physiologic markers. We will record anthropomorphic data (height, weight, BMI), blood pressures, measure lunch consumption and preferences, as well as have children participate in standardized fitness test to evaluate outcomes. We additionally aim to assist the schools in creating school lunches that are healthy, as well as liked by students in order to decrease food waste. Documentation of percentage of food consumption as well as type of food consumed for each child at lunch will be collected. A faces scale will be used to determine the children’s interest in varying foods. Our goal is to integrate all of this information into a mobile app in the form of a game. Given the prevalence of technology use in today’s youth, a game allowing children to track their progress in this format may encourage their participation. As the children make positive health choices in terms of eating healthy and participating in physical activity, they will advance levels in the game. Technology from the Remote Food Photography Method (RFPM) could be a possible avenue for the food consumption portion. Hypothesis: We hypothesize that our data will support the USPTF guidelines that face-time will create positive change for longterm Pediatric weight loss in our continued efforts in decreasing Obesity rates. Furthermore, integrating collected information into a mobile app game that children can participate in should create easily accessible information and increase participation.